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Category Archive Tax Planning

Bydylanbbd

2021 Budget Review

After a year of Covid-19 restrictions, the 2021 Budget had a lot of ground to cover. There has been considerable speculation over how the extra expense of the furlough scheme, funding the NHS and supporting those out of work would be paid for.

It was also questionable whether the current package of support for individuals and businesses could be sustained.

So what are the plans for recovering from the pandemic and rebuilding the economy? Read about the Chancellor’s budget overview in our latest publication, download it here.


If you would like to find out more information or would like to start investing today, please contact Money Advice & Planning Ltd on 0345 241 1808 or e-mail us at enquiries@mapfinances.co.uk.

The material is for general information only and does not constitute investment, tax, legal or other form of advice. You should not rely on this information to make (or refrain from making) any decisions. Links to external sites are for information only and do not constitute endorsement. Always obtain independent professional advice for your own particular situation. Money Advice & Planning Ltd is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

Bymapfinancesadmin

MAP Spring 2021 Budget Highlights

Check out our highlights of the Spring 2021 Budget from 3rd March 2021 using the reader below.

2021-Spring-Budget

If the above reader does not display correctly, you can access the guide by clicking here.

Bymapfinancesadmin

MAP Newsletter – Quarter 4 2020

Check out the latest financial insights for the final quarter of 2020 using the reader below.

If the above reader does not display correctly, you can access the newsletter by clicking here.

Bymapfinancesadmin

MAP Newsletter – Quarter 3 2020

Check out the latest financial insights for the third quarter of 2020 using the reader below.

If the above reader does not display correctly, you can access the newsletter by clicking here.

Bymapfinancesadmin

MAP Spring 2020 Budget Highlights

Check out our highlights of the Spring 2020 Budget from 11th March 2020 using the reader below.

2020-Spring-Budget

If the above reader does not display correctly, you can access the guide by clicking here.

Bymapfinancesadmin

MAP Newsletter – Quarter 2 2020

Check out the latest financial insights for the second quarter of 2020 using the reader below.

If the above reader does not display correctly, you can access the newsletter by clicking here.

Bymapfinancesadmin

New Tax Year Planning Pt. 2

In our second post about tax planning ahead of the new tax year, we look at income sharing, pension contributions, ISAs and Capital Gains.

Income Sharing

Always try and share income (if possible) between spouses, and so perhaps keep one or both of you out of 40% tax. Yes, we know this is not always possible, but for those who are self-employed, you should think about forming a partnership with your spouse, that would allow this.

Pension Contributions

Where you can afford it, try and maximise pension contributions. Bear in mind that you can put up to £40,000 into your pension every year, and equally where you haven’t used the previous three year’s allowances, you could put that into your pension too.

As you are potentially talking about paying up to £160,000 into your pension, then yes, you obviously need to be able to afford it. And whilst this money would be locked away until age 55 at the earliest, it would be less money to pay tax on now and mean a bigger pension upon retirement.

We had one client who through no fault of her own, received a salary which put her into the 45% tax bracket. Therefore, it was more than worth her while to put the excess amount which caused this, into her pension. You get tax relief at your highest rate of tax – and 45% relief is not to be snubbed! For every £1,000 that went into her pension, she only needed to pay £550, so that’s a bargain!

ISAs

Putting money into an ISA will reduce taxation, as there is no tax on dividends received, and ISAs will never be subject to Capital Gains Tax (CGT), no matter how much you encash later on.

Capital Gains

Everyone has an allowance of £11,700 which means you can make gains of £11,700 per year and pay no capital gains tax at all. This is one of those allowances with a ‘use it or lose it’ scenario, so if you are thinking about cashing in on something which would take you over this limit, and it is possible to cash in part of it this tax year and another part next tax year, you could make gains of £23,400 with no tax to pay at all.

This obviously may not always be possible, but can be done with investments and mean less of your gains are given away in tax.


If you would like to find out more information or would like to start investing today, please contact Money Advice & Planning Ltd on 0345 241 1808 or e-mail us at enquiries@mapfinances.co.uk.

The material is for general information only and does not constitute investment, tax, legal or other form of advice. You should not rely on this information to make (or refrain from making) any decisions. Links to external sites are for information only and do not constitute endorsement. Always obtain independent professional advice for your own particular situation. Money Advice & Planning Ltd is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

Bymapfinancesadmin

New Tax Year Planning Pt. 1

In the first of two posts about tax planning, ahead of the new tax year, we look at how you can use salaries, dividends and pensions to maximise tax-free income.

Salaries

You may think this is a strange one to put in for tax planning, but it is an obvious one, and sometimes we all miss the obvious. The main thing to remember about personal allowances is use it or lose it – it’s that simple.

In the current year we get a personal allowance of £11,850 which is the amount we can earn without paying any tax. If you have your own company, and you or your spouse haven’t used your allowances for the year, it is worth thinking about taking an amount as a salary to use these allowances up. After all, if you don’t, it means some tax-free money has gone.

Dividends

As with the above, if you are a shareholder of your own company, think about taking £2,000 in dividends, as this would be tax-free. Please ensure however that you have profits of at least this amount, as dividends should only be taken out of net profits.

You should even look at the possibility of taking out more than £2,000 if the company can afford it, as dividends over £2,000 are taxed at 7.5% for those in the 20% tax bracket (a saving of 12.5%) and at 32.5% for those in the 40% tax bracket (a saving of 7.5%). The same warning as before still applies however; the company must be making equivalent profits.

Pension Income

If you are taking a pension income and your fund could stand you taking out more and this amount is available tax-free, i.e. by taking up to £11,850, then why not? You should always maximise the tax-free element – even if you extract it and put it in the bank – as at least you are not paying tax on it. Don’t forget this applies per person, so if you are married, your spouse can do the same.


If you would like to find out more information or would like help with any aspect of tax planning mentioned, please contact Money Advice & Planning Ltd on 0345 241 1808 or e-mail us at enquiries@mapfinances.co.uk.

The material is for general information only and does not constitute investment, tax, legal or other form of advice. You should not rely on this information to make (or refrain from making) any decisions. Links to external sites are for information only and do not constitute endorsement. Always obtain independent professional advice for your own particular situation. Money Advice & Planning Ltd is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

Bymapfinancesadmin

Tax Planning for Spouses

Capital

As mentioned in a separate article in our January 2019 Professional Newsletter, as transfers between husband and wife are ignored for Capital Gains Tax (CGT) purposes, why not use this as much as you can to reduce a clients’ tax bill for any gains?

Pensions

Many a time when looking at a couple’s finances, everything seems to be done in the husband’s name and very little in the wife’s. If you are wanting to reduce long-term tax, this needs to change.

Let’s say all pension planning is done in the husband’s name alone, and he ends up with a pension of £60k p/year. This will obviously be well into 40% tax whereas, if it was done jointly and evenly, such that each party had £30k pensions p/year, only 20% tax would be payable. That represents a big tax saving and shouldn’t be ignored. Planning must be started early on to achieve this – and that’s where MAP comes in.

If you are doing accounts for a self-employed person, is it possible to do the same thing as a partnership, by introducing a wife into the planning? Perhaps through setting up a Limited Liability Partnership?

Inheritance

Every individual now gets £325k basic exemption from Inheritance Tax Planning (IHT), and then on top of this is the residence nil rate band which in due course will bring the exemptions up to £500k per person. The same applies with CGT – if assets were owned jointly, then maximum exemption could be obtained, and so significant savings on tax could be made.

A lot of these simple exemptions need a bit of planning as they just don’t happen overnight. Care has to be taken every step of the way to ensure compliance with the legislation, and that is what we do at MAP.

One of our IFAs is also a qualified accountant (and ex-Inland Revenue employee), who has many years’ experience as a financial adviser, and his work is all about planning. If he can help your clients, just let us know.

If you would like to find out more information or would like to start investing today, please contact Money Advice & Planning Ltd on 0345 241 1808 or e-mail us at enquiries@mapfinances.co.uk.

The material is for general information only and does not constitute investment, tax, legal or other form of advice. You should not rely on this information to make (or refrain from making) any decisions. Links to external sites are for information only and do not constitute endorsement. Always obtain independent professional advice for your own particular situation. Money Advice & Planning Ltd is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

Bymapfinancesadmin

CGT Planning

More and more clients need to do some Capital Gains Tax planning (CGT) as investment valuations rise. So here are some things you may wish to consider as an accountant or solicitor.

Personal Allowances

The current CGT allowance is £11,700 per person, and it is always logical to make gains up to this value each year, because the allowance is a use it or lose it one.

If your client is looking at a big gain one year, try and flush out any smaller gains beforehand and do this under the limit, as these could be covered by the allowance.

Another thing to remember with allowances like this is that for married people, both husband and wife get the same allowance. If one spouse is looking at a gain and the other isn’t, is there anything to be done by transferring ownership of some assets between spouses, or indeed making some assets jointly owned? Gifts between husband and wife are exempt from any CGT, so this should be utilised as much as possible.

Rates

The entrepreneur’s rate is only 10% and the more we can allocate to this, if selling a business or part of a business, would be very helpful.

The main rates of course are 10% if someone is a basic rate taxpayer, and 20% if a higher rate taxpayer, so once again if you are looking at planning for spouses and the gain is being made by the higher-taxed person, see what you can gift between spouses, to reduce the tax payable.

This is especially true of residential property which is rented out, where gains made by basic rate taxpayers are charged at 18%, and higher rate taxpayers at 28%.

Basic Planning

Although it mainly affects investors, perhaps more attention should be paid into putting more and more money into ISAs, which are not liable at all for CGT.

CGT deferral can also be made by investing in Enterprise Investment Scheme (EIS) companies, so this could give your clients time to plan. If an EIS company is invested in and held for three years, there is no CGT on a later disposal.

As independent IFAs who have done EIS investments for clients, we can look over the whole of the market to see the best one for your clients.

What not give us a call and let us help in your client’s overall tax planning?

If you would like to find out more information or would like to start investing today, please contact Money Advice & Planning Ltd on 0345 241 1808 or e-mail us at enquiries@mapfinances.co.uk.

The material is for general information only and does not constitute investment, tax, legal or other form of advice. You should not rely on this information to make (or refrain from making) any decisions. Links to external sites are for information only and do not constitute endorsement. Always obtain independent professional advice for your own particular situation. Money Advice & Planning Ltd is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.